Wedding Prophecies

In the 1362nd year of the Age of Aries (anno domini 1223), Devorguilla of Galloway was married to John, Baron de Balliol. For reasons best known to themselves, the faeries of Galloway decided to offer gifts to the couple.

The Journey of the Washerwomen

When Baishe the Alewife, Bragha and Calybrid took the washing of the Academica Septima Superior to a nearby stream, they found themselves lost in a disorienting fog, and being led about by a faerie who introduced himself as Cockerel Keith.

Keith took the three women on a whirlwind tour of Galloway, stopping three times to collect a wedding gift.

The Spiral Prophecy

The first stop was in the subterranean halls of Clan MacArawn. The MacArawn presented the washerwomen with a finely-wrought scroll, on which was drawn a huge and intricate ogham spiral (which the MacArawn referred to as "the language of ancient kings"). Though no-one at the Academica could read ogham, the MacArawn explained that the magi would be able to comprehend it at the appropriate time.

When opened at the wedding, the prophecy read:

Your son shall be King of Scots, though Scotland shall never know peace.

The Runic Prophecy

From there, Cockerel Keith brought the washerwomen to the coast of the Solway Firth, where the King of the Selkies and his court were sunning themselves. The King gave the three women another scroll, this one bearing Norse runes (which the Selkie King referred to as "the language of the drowned men"). Though no-one at the Academica could read the runes, the King explained that the magi would be able to comprehend it at the appropriate time.

When opened at the wedding, the prophecy read:

Your son shall bring the warring Scots together as brothers, though the line of Kenneth Mac Alpin shall be forever ended.

The Transeudokian Prophecy

Finally, the washerwomen were led home, to the slopes of the Merrick, overlooking the Academica. There, they were accosted by Scylla, who demanded the magi deliver a third scroll. The final scroll bore strange, angular characters (which Scylla referred to as "the language of lands beyone Eudokia"). Though no-one at the Academica could read it, Scylla explained that the magi would be able to comprehend it at the appropriate time.

When opened at the wedding, the prophecy read:

Your son shall bring kings forth from Galloway, though over the Galwegians none shall be king.

Magi as Couriers

The magi, anticipating worthwhile rewards for their efforts, took the three prophecies to the wedding. Naturally enough, the reading of the prophecies caused great consternation among the assembled guests. Various nobles saw the prophecies as an attempt by the magi to meddle in the affairs of the de Balliols, the Palatinate of Durham or Galloway, and to upset the orderly succession of the Kings of Scots.

Violence broke out (in which Xenophon received a broken nose, contributing further to his hatred of travel outside the covenant), and bloodshed was narrowly averted by the intervention of Alan, Lord of Galloway. The magi left Barnard castle in disgrace, and have not ventured into England since.

Faerie Rewards

As expected, the MacArawn and Selkie King provided payment for the magi's efforts. Scylla has not made any effort to compensate them.

The MacArawn told stories of ancient stones:

The Selkie King told stories of the waters and shore:

  • the Burning Hill, a viking cemetary
  • the Halls of the Drowned, a realm under the Solway Firth (most likely a magical or faerie regio) where norsemen lost in the Irish sea remain held in living death.
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